Archive for People

Quotes on How to Deal With Difficult People

We all have to deal with difficult people from time to time. Perhaps it is a noisy neighbor or a bossy coworker. Fortunately, we can draw from the wisdom of the ages to help us gain inspiration. With this in mind, here are some quotes on how to deal with difficult people.

Dealing with negative criticism is the hardest. As Sydney B. Simon once wrote, “I defy anyone reading this book to tell me that she or he has ever felt in different, let alone uplifted, enriched, cheered up, or enhanced when put on the receiving end of a blast of criticism.”

Another of Mr. Simon’s quotes on how to deal with difficult people: “Thousands upon thousands of us [fail] to recognize that the knives of negative criticism which people stick in us are just as sharp and deadly as those made of steel and borne by assassins… our society has somehow conditioned us to accept the notion that criticism of all sorts is bound to be good for us. That it will make us more mature. That one of the marks of being a grown up woman or man is the ability to absorb all sorts of critical jabs, barbs, and thrusts. That the more it hurts the better for us.”

Mr. Simon is exactly right when he wrote this.

It’s true that many people refuse to listen to completely justified criticism. However, we are being drowned by the “self-help” ruse that we must listen to criticism because it is always say “gift” from people who care about us!

The people who are so quick to point out the importance of listening to constructive criticism forget the flipside; that other people can use negative and destructive criticism as a powerful weapon to break us down!

Jay Carter, author of the book “Nasty People” called such difficult people “invalidators.” He wrote: “It’s hard to recognize and invalidator, because a truly good one can bypass the scrutiny of your logical mind, and you find yourself feeling bad without knowing why…. the invalidator actually feels inferior to some other person, so he or she tries to make the other person feel small. Thus, the invalidator can control the victim.

George Zgourides defined the constant critic thusly: “This opponent is fond of pointing out your imperfections… everything you do is bad… and the criticizer feels compelled to tell you all about it, even if you don’t want to hear it.”

The author of this article describes in many more ways how to have a conversation with difficult people and how to deal with them effectively in his new course, “Break out of your Shell! How To Overcome Shyness So You Can Get On With Your Life!” In it, he discusses the following types of difficult people and how to talk with them:

Quotes on How to Deal With Difficult People

We all have to deal with difficult people from time to time. Perhaps it is a noisy neighbor or a bossy coworker. Fortunately, we can draw from the wisdom of the ages to help us gain inspiration. With this in mind, here are some quotes on how to deal with difficult people.

Dealing with negative criticism is the hardest. As Sydney B. Simon once wrote, “I defy anyone reading this book to tell me that she or he has ever felt in different, let alone uplifted, enriched, cheered up, or enhanced when put on the receiving end of a blast of criticism.”

Another of Mr. Simon’s quotes on how to deal with difficult people: “Thousands upon thousands of us [fail] to recognize that the knives of negative criticism which people stick in us are just as sharp and deadly as those made of steel and borne by assassins… our society has somehow conditioned us to accept the notion that criticism of all sorts is bound to be good for us. That it will make us more mature. That one of the marks of being a grown up woman or man is the ability to absorb all sorts of critical jabs, barbs, and thrusts. That the more it hurts the better for us.”

Mr. Simon is exactly right when he wrote this.

It’s true that many people refuse to listen to completely justified criticism. However, we are being drowned by the “self-help” ruse that we must listen to criticism because it is always say “gift” from people who care about us!

The people who are so quick to point out the importance of listening to constructive criticism forget the flipside; that other people can use negative and destructive criticism as a powerful weapon to break us down!

Jay Carter, author of the book “Nasty People” called such difficult people “invalidators.” He wrote: “It’s hard to recognize and invalidator, because a truly good one can bypass the scrutiny of your logical mind, and you find yourself feeling bad without knowing why…. the invalidator actually feels inferior to some other person, so he or she tries to make the other person feel small. Thus, the invalidator can control the victim.

George Zgourides defined the constant critic thusly: “This opponent is fond of pointing out your imperfections… everything you do is bad… and the criticizer feels compelled to tell you all about it, even if you don’t want to hear it.”

The author of this article describes in many more ways how to have a conversation with difficult people and how to deal with them effectively in his new course, “Break out of your Shell! How To Overcome Shyness So You Can Get On With Your Life!” In it, he discusses the following types of difficult people and how to talk with them:

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Quotes on How to Deal With Difficult People

We all have to deal with difficult people from time to time. Perhaps it is a noisy neighbor or a bossy coworker. Fortunately, we can draw from the wisdom of the ages to help us gain inspiration. With this in mind, here are some quotes on how to deal with difficult people.

Dealing with negative criticism is the hardest. As Sydney B. Simon once wrote, “I defy anyone reading this book to tell me that she or he has ever felt in different, let alone uplifted, enriched, cheered up, or enhanced when put on the receiving end of a blast of criticism.”

Another of Mr. Simon’s quotes on how to deal with difficult people: “Thousands upon thousands of us [fail] to recognize that the knives of negative criticism which people stick in us are just as sharp and deadly as those made of steel and borne by assassins… our society has somehow conditioned us to accept the notion that criticism of all sorts is bound to be good for us. That it will make us more mature. That one of the marks of being a grown up woman or man is the ability to absorb all sorts of critical jabs, barbs, and thrusts. That the more it hurts the better for us.”

Mr. Simon is exactly right when he wrote this.

It’s true that many people refuse to listen to completely justified criticism. However, we are being drowned by the “self-help” ruse that we must listen to criticism because it is always say “gift” from people who care about us!

The people who are so quick to point out the importance of listening to constructive criticism forget the flipside; that other people can use negative and destructive criticism as a powerful weapon to break us down!

Jay Carter, author of the book “Nasty People” called such difficult people “invalidators.” He wrote: “It’s hard to recognize and invalidator, because a truly good one can bypass the scrutiny of your logical mind, and you find yourself feeling bad without knowing why…. the invalidator actually feels inferior to some other person, so he or she tries to make the other person feel small. Thus, the invalidator can control the victim.

George Zgourides defined the constant critic thusly: “This opponent is fond of pointing out your imperfections… everything you do is bad… and the criticizer feels compelled to tell you all about it, even if you don’t want to hear it.”

The author of this article describes in many more ways how to have a conversation with difficult people and how to deal with them effectively in his new course, “Break out of your Shell! How To Overcome Shyness So You Can Get On With Your Life!” In it, he discusses the following types of difficult people and how to talk with them:

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Quotes on How to Deal With Difficult People

We all have to deal with difficult people from time to time. Perhaps it is a noisy neighbor or a bossy coworker. Fortunately, we can draw from the wisdom of the ages to help us gain inspiration. With this in mind, here are some quotes on how to deal with difficult people.

Dealing with negative criticism is the hardest. As Sydney B. Simon once wrote, “I defy anyone reading this book to tell me that she or he has ever felt in different, let alone uplifted, enriched, cheered up, or enhanced when put on the receiving end of a blast of criticism.”

Another of Mr. Simon’s quotes on how to deal with difficult people: “Thousands upon thousands of us [fail] to recognize that the knives of negative criticism which people stick in us are just as sharp and deadly as those made of steel and borne by assassins… our society has somehow conditioned us to accept the notion that criticism of all sorts is bound to be good for us. That it will make us more mature. That one of the marks of being a grown up woman or man is the ability to absorb all sorts of critical jabs, barbs, and thrusts. That the more it hurts the better for us.”

Mr. Simon is exactly right when he wrote this.

It’s true that many people refuse to listen to completely justified criticism. However, we are being drowned by the “self-help” ruse that we must listen to criticism because it is always say “gift” from people who care about us!

The people who are so quick to point out the importance of listening to constructive criticism forget the flipside; that other people can use negative and destructive criticism as a powerful weapon to break us down!

Jay Carter, author of the book “Nasty People” called such difficult people “invalidators.” He wrote: “It’s hard to recognize and invalidator, because a truly good one can bypass the scrutiny of your logical mind, and you find yourself feeling bad without knowing why…. the invalidator actually feels inferior to some other person, so he or she tries to make the other person feel small. Thus, the invalidator can control the victim.

George Zgourides defined the constant critic thusly: “This opponent is fond of pointing out your imperfections… everything you do is bad… and the criticizer feels compelled to tell you all about it, even if you don’t want to hear it.”

The author of this article describes in many more ways how to have a conversation with difficult people and how to deal with them effectively in his new course, “Break out of your Shell! How To Overcome Shyness So You Can Get On With Your Life!” In it, he discusses the following types of difficult people and how to talk with them:

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Quotes on How to Deal With Difficult People

We all have to deal with difficult people from time to time. Perhaps it is a noisy neighbor or a bossy coworker. Fortunately, we can draw from the wisdom of the ages to help us gain inspiration. With this in mind, here are some quotes on how to deal with difficult people.

Dealing with negative criticism is the hardest. As Sydney B. Simon once wrote, “I defy anyone reading this book to tell me that she or he has ever felt in different, let alone uplifted, enriched, cheered up, or enhanced when put on the receiving end of a blast of criticism.”

Another of Mr. Simon’s quotes on how to deal with difficult people: “Thousands upon thousands of us [fail] to recognize that the knives of negative criticism which people stick in us are just as sharp and deadly as those made of steel and borne by assassins… our society has somehow conditioned us to accept the notion that criticism of all sorts is bound to be good for us. That it will make us more mature. That one of the marks of being a grown up woman or man is the ability to absorb all sorts of critical jabs, barbs, and thrusts. That the more it hurts the better for us.”

Mr. Simon is exactly right when he wrote this.

It’s true that many people refuse to listen to completely justified criticism. However, we are being drowned by the “self-help” ruse that we must listen to criticism because it is always say “gift” from people who care about us!

The people who are so quick to point out the importance of listening to constructive criticism forget the flipside; that other people can use negative and destructive criticism as a powerful weapon to break us down!

Jay Carter, author of the book “Nasty People” called such difficult people “invalidators.” He wrote: “It’s hard to recognize and invalidator, because a truly good one can bypass the scrutiny of your logical mind, and you find yourself feeling bad without knowing why…. the invalidator actually feels inferior to some other person, so he or she tries to make the other person feel small. Thus, the invalidator can control the victim.

George Zgourides defined the constant critic thusly: “This opponent is fond of pointing out your imperfections… everything you do is bad… and the criticizer feels compelled to tell you all about it, even if you don’t want to hear it.”

The author of this article describes in many more ways how to have a conversation with difficult people and how to deal with them effectively in his new course, “Break out of your Shell! How To Overcome Shyness So You Can Get On With Your Life!” In it, he discusses the following types of difficult people and how to talk with them:

Quotes on How to Deal With Difficult People

We all have to deal with difficult people from time to time. Perhaps it is a noisy neighbor or a bossy coworker. Fortunately, we can draw from the wisdom of the ages to help us gain inspiration. With this in mind, here are some quotes on how to deal with difficult people.

Dealing with negative criticism is the hardest. As Sydney B. Simon once wrote, “I defy anyone reading this book to tell me that she or he has ever felt in different, let alone uplifted, enriched, cheered up, or enhanced when put on the receiving end of a blast of criticism.”

Another of Mr. Simon’s quotes on how to deal with difficult people: “Thousands upon thousands of us [fail] to recognize that the knives of negative criticism which people stick in us are just as sharp and deadly as those made of steel and borne by assassins… our society has somehow conditioned us to accept the notion that criticism of all sorts is bound to be good for us. That it will make us more mature. That one of the marks of being a grown up woman or man is the ability to absorb all sorts of critical jabs, barbs, and thrusts. That the more it hurts the better for us.”

Mr. Simon is exactly right when he wrote this.

It’s true that many people refuse to listen to completely justified criticism. However, we are being drowned by the “self-help” ruse that we must listen to criticism because it is always say “gift” from people who care about us!

The people who are so quick to point out the importance of listening to constructive criticism forget the flipside; that other people can use negative and destructive criticism as a powerful weapon to break us down!

Jay Carter, author of the book “Nasty People” called such difficult people “invalidators.” He wrote: “It’s hard to recognize and invalidator, because a truly good one can bypass the scrutiny of your logical mind, and you find yourself feeling bad without knowing why…. the invalidator actually feels inferior to some other person, so he or she tries to make the other person feel small. Thus, the invalidator can control the victim.

George Zgourides defined the constant critic thusly: “This opponent is fond of pointing out your imperfections… everything you do is bad… and the criticizer feels compelled to tell you all about it, even if you don’t want to hear it.”

The author of this article describes in many more ways how to have a conversation with difficult people and how to deal with them effectively in his new course, “Break out of your Shell! How To Overcome Shyness So You Can Get On With Your Life!” In it, he discusses the following types of difficult people and how to talk with them:

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Quotes on How to Deal With Difficult People

We all have to deal with difficult people from time to time. Perhaps it is a noisy neighbor or a bossy coworker. Fortunately, we can draw from the wisdom of the ages to help us gain inspiration. With this in mind, here are some quotes on how to deal with difficult people.

Dealing with negative criticism is the hardest. As Sydney B. Simon once wrote, “I defy anyone reading this book to tell me that she or he has ever felt in different, let alone uplifted, enriched, cheered up, or enhanced when put on the receiving end of a blast of criticism.”

Another of Mr. Simon’s quotes on how to deal with difficult people: “Thousands upon thousands of us [fail] to recognize that the knives of negative criticism which people stick in us are just as sharp and deadly as those made of steel and borne by assassins… our society has somehow conditioned us to accept the notion that criticism of all sorts is bound to be good for us. That it will make us more mature. That one of the marks of being a grown up woman or man is the ability to absorb all sorts of critical jabs, barbs, and thrusts. That the more it hurts the better for us.”

Mr. Simon is exactly right when he wrote this.

It’s true that many people refuse to listen to completely justified criticism. However, we are being drowned by the “self-help” ruse that we must listen to criticism because it is always say “gift” from people who care about us!

The people who are so quick to point out the importance of listening to constructive criticism forget the flipside; that other people can use negative and destructive criticism as a powerful weapon to break us down!

Jay Carter, author of the book “Nasty People” called such difficult people “invalidators.” He wrote: “It’s hard to recognize and invalidator, because a truly good one can bypass the scrutiny of your logical mind, and you find yourself feeling bad without knowing why…. the invalidator actually feels inferior to some other person, so he or she tries to make the other person feel small. Thus, the invalidator can control the victim.

George Zgourides defined the constant critic thusly: “This opponent is fond of pointing out your imperfections… everything you do is bad… and the criticizer feels compelled to tell you all about it, even if you don’t want to hear it.”

The author of this article describes in many more ways how to have a conversation with difficult people and how to deal with them effectively in his new course, “Break out of your Shell! How To Overcome Shyness So You Can Get On With Your Life!” In it, he discusses the following types of difficult people and how to talk with them:

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Dating Apps 'Make People Less Likely To Commit To Relationships', Warn Experts

Dating Apps 'Make People Less Likely To Commit To Relationships', Warn Experts
Experts have raised concerns over whether dating apps are making people less committed in relationships. Speaking on Radio 4's The Long View programme, journalist Siam Goorwich said: "The thing with online dating and Tinder in particular is that it's …
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#1 Dating Site for People Living with STDs, PositiveSingles.Com, Announces the Results of a Debate about People with Herpes


Los Angeles California (PRWEB) July 07, 2014

PositiveSingles.com, known to hold a number of interesting debates on their website, recently asked members whether they should let their partner know that they are infected with herpes in respect to a sexual relationship: before, during, or after sex in cases where no preventative measures are taken by either party.

The users who participated in the debate had varying answers. 71.93% stated that herpes should always be disclosed before sex, regardless of the attitude that their partner has. Those members believe that it is their responsibility to stop the spread of the virus, and that it’s best to communicate when herpes is present, regardless of whether the person who is positive with the infection will have any contact with the other partner again.

While the first answer was most common, 28.07% of the members who took part in the debate stated that herpes is too common to make a big fuss about, because it is passed all of the time during casual sex, and disclosure is not necessary. They based their viewpoint on the fact that most people who are infected don’t even know it, so it’s often passed from one person to another without disclosure. Those members did, however, believe that preventative measures should be used, and they thought that should be enough, as anyone who has casual sex already knows that they are exposing themselves to a certain number of risks.

“Although we empower our members to make choices that best fit their personal and sexual lives, PositiveSingles.com advocates for full disclosure before putting someone at risk,” stated Positive Singles’ Spokesperson, Jenelle Marie. “Our platform provides a safe space for users to communicate with the community at large, to develop healthy and conscientious relationships, and to learn how to have some of the tougher conversations surrounding disclosure.”

If you’d like to learn more about the world’s No. 1 site for dating while living with an STD, kindly visit http://www.PositiveSingles.com.

About PositiveSingles

PositiveSingles.com is known as one of the biggest dating sites in the world that caters to those who are living with STDs. Together, with the great features it offers, the site also promises not to share anyone’s information with a third party and aims at keeping all of its users secure.

Media Contact

Jenelle Marie

mediapress(at)successfulmatch(dot)com

Spokesperson of PositiveSingles.com